Books

Indefinite Detention and Antiterrorism Laws: Balancing Security and Human Rights

This article does more than describe British and American anti-terrorism laws; it shows how those laws go through conflicted government branches and the bargains struck to create the anti-terrorism laws that exist today. Instead of taking these laws as given, this Article explains why they exist. More specifically, this article focuses on the path anti-terrorism legislation followed in the United States and the United Kingdom, with particular focus on each country’s ability (or lack thereof) to indefinitely detain suspected non-citizen terrorists. Both countries’ executives sought to have that power and both were limited by the legislatures and courts but in different ways. These differences show the human rights concerns both countries grappled with when enacting anti-terrorism legislation and how the two governments approached balancing those concerns.

These anti-terrorism laws also show which government branches possessed the most power when creating the legislation, which branches dictated the terms of these laws, and which branches were forced to compromise. The different paths taken by the anti-terrorism legislation in both countries also show the different styles of the two governments. The branches of the United States government are more likely to openly defy each other, knowing that checks and balances will ensure that no branch dominates. In the United Kingdom, there is no strong tradition of checks and balances so informal bargaining and consulting among the branches is more common before legislation is proposed or amended. The United Kingdom’s Human Rights Act has, however, begun to change the culture and has caused more open opposition among the three branches.

Categories: Books

Bigger Isn’t Always Better: An Analysis of Court Efficiency Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling

One important measure of trial court efficiency is overall case length—that is, the elapsed time from a case’s initial filing to its final disposition. Using a large, recent dataset from nearly 7000 federal civil cases, we find that two variables are particularly useful in predicting overall case length: the total number of attorneys filing an appearance in the case, and the number of authorized judgeships for a given district court. Further, we find a significant and surprising interaction between these two variables, indicating that smaller courts are more efficient than larger courts at processing civil cases when more than three attorneys appear in a case, but that the opposite holds true when three attorneys or fewer appear in a case.

Categories: Books

Opening the Gate to Money Market Fund Reform

This article proceeds as follows. Part I outlines briefly the background of MMFs. Part II discusses the role of the board of directors in governing MMFs, a role upon which our proposal would build. Part III discusses MMF-related events during the financial crisis of 2007-2008 and describes the government’s response to these events. Part IV describes the reforms the SEC instituted in 2010. Part V outlines options for further reform. Part VI outlines and discusses benefits and drawbacks of our proposed solution—unrestricted discretionary gating by fund boards. Part VII concludes.

Categories: Books

Taxpayers’ Lack of Standing in International Tax Dispute Resolutions: An Analysis Based on the Hybrid Norms of International Taxation

This paper examines whether a taxpayer should have “standing” in international dispute resolutions. To answer this question the primary task is to identify the nature of international taxation. In other words, this paper discusses how to classify the field of international taxation. Is it part of public international law, private international law (i.e., conflict of laws), national (domestic) law, or is it a hybrid field that requires specific attention? Making this distinction is vital for resolving disputes when a taxpayer is taxed twice for cross-border transactions in cases where the double tax convention is unclear and both contracting states claim full or partial tax on accrued income.

In 1924, the Permanent Court of International Justice defined dispute as “disagreement on a point of law or fact, a conflict of legal views or of interests between two persons.” In the case brought before the Court in 1924, it determined that the dispute started between an individual and a state, but then the individual’s government “took up the case. The dispute then entered upon a new phase; it entered the domain of international law, and became a dispute between two States.” If we analogize that case to a tax case derived by a cross-border transaction, there is no doubt that we have a dispute — a dispute on tax liability. But there are still two lingering doubts. First, is it an international dispute? And second, who are the parties to it? If one examines the current mechanisms available in the OECD Model Tax Convention for resolving double taxation disputes, one realizes that the taxpayer’s standing is somewhat ambiguous. In order to clarify this ambiguity we need to address the question of categorizing the conflict as a national or international one.

The question at stake is whether a taxpayer should be a party to the dispute resolution process. In this paper, the cases cited are limited to where double tax treaties apply. I reserve the cases where they are inapplicable to further discussion.

Part I highlights the tax complexity arising from cross-border transactions. Since the article focuses on OECD Model dispute resolution mechanisms, Part II briefly introduces the model’s history and its official aims. Part III discusses the available dispute resolution mechanism in the OECD Model — the Mutual Agreement Process (MAP) and Arbitration. Part IV reviews the hybrid elements of international taxation. This paper suggests that international taxation has both national and international characteristics. This hybrid nature is the basis of the discussion in Part V: after identifying the parties to the international tax dispute, this paper suggests two solutions to the research question — the apparent and normative solutions. In the former, a taxpayer should have standing in the international dispute, though recall that this solution is not based on normative grounds. The normative rationale introduces the equity principle whereby taxpayers should have no official role in resolving the dispute. Finally, this paper offers a brief recommendation in Part VI.

Categories: Books

Reexamining the Seventh Amendment Argument Against Issue Certification

Issue certification does not run afoul of the Seventh Amendment because of the constitutional doctrines of standing and ripeness. Part II(A) and II(B) examines FRCP 23 and the history of class actions and issue certifications. Next, Part II(C) analyzes Rhone Poulenc and its Seventh Amendment analysis. Part III(A) argues that ripeness and standing undermine Seventh Amendment arguments concerning reexamination. First, as to ripeness, the reexamination argument relies on a series of speculations: that the class plaintiffs will prevail on the trial of the common issues; and that a second jury would—contrary to legal presumptions — ignore the trial judge’s instructions, and then reexamine some part of the class decision. These multiple suppositions should not preclude issue classes. Second, even if the matter becomes ripe, the defendant will still lack standing: it is only when the issue-class plaintiff prevails on the first round that a second jury could exist. If the second jury spurns the trial court’s instructions by revisiting issues decided in the first trial, that reexamination would likely redound to the defendant’s benefit, diminishing in some manner the common issue finding favoring the class plaintiffs. Thus, the defendants would lack standing to advance a Seventh Amendment claim because the defendants would suffer no harm. Finally, Part III(B) notes that the class plaintiffs—the likely potential victims of any jury reexamination—can avoid a Seventh Amendment complaint by voluntarily and knowingly waiving violations, just as American citizens can for any of their constitutional rights.

Categories: Books

Tipping the Scales in Favor of Charitable Bequests: A Critique

The public policy favoring testamentary bequests to charities is well established in the law. However, that public policy can, and does, conflict with other equally well-founded public policies. When confronted with this conflict, courts are often dismissive or even hostile towards the parties seeking to challenge a testamentary bequest to a charity. I argue that the policy favoring charitable giving has gone too far and has, in some instances, undermined other important public policies. Specifically, courts and legislators have strengthened the charitable bequest policy without giving enough consideration to other, equally important public policies. This problem is not new. History shows that similar policy conflicts have arisen periodically since late antiquity, if not earlier. The parameters of the problem, however, are somewhat new. The governing law, available technologies, and familial relationships have certainly evolved since the time of late antiquity. This article examines how the public policy favoring charitable bequests conflicts with various aspects of the equally important public policies of testamentary freedom and family protection.

Part II considers the competing public policies of testamentary freedom, family protection, and charitable bequests, as well as the existing legal doctrines aimed at furthering these policies. Part III examines the social and legal origins of charitable bequests and the periodic attempts to balance charitable bequests with other important policy considerations. Part IV examines the role of the non-profit sector in America today. Specifically, Part IV considers the size and scope of the nonprofit industry, the legal and economic benefits the nonprofit industry enjoys, and the manner in which nonprofits solicit charitable bequests. Part V illustrates how the current law fails to strike the appropriate balance between the competing policies, as the current law is too favorable to charities and reform is needed. Part VI concludes.

Categories: Books

Foundation Zoho [E-Book] / Ali Shabdar

Catalog: Electronic Books - Tue, 07/19/2011 - 21:00
Shabdar, Ali
Categories: Books

Zsófia Torma [E-Book]

Catalog: Electronic Books - Tue, 07/19/2011 - 21:00
Categories: Books

Zsófia Torma [E-Book]

Catalog: Electronic Books - Tue, 07/19/2011 - 21:00
Categories: Books

Zoran Djindjic [E-Book]

Catalog: Electronic Books - Tue, 07/19/2011 - 21:00
Categories: Books

Zora Neale Hurston [E-Book]

Catalog: Electronic Books - Tue, 07/19/2011 - 21:00
Categories: Books

Zoho for Dummies [E-Book]

Catalog: Electronic Books - Tue, 07/19/2011 - 21:00
Holzner, Steven Author
Categories: Books
Syndicate content