Honors Courses (Spring 2012)

Honors courses are designed to be innovative and challenging. They may be interdisciplinary, focus on great works and ideas, cover issues of keen interest, or present a topic in great depth with a faculty member who has expertise in that subject. Honors courses are open only to students in the Pforzheimer Honors College. Students who are not in the Honors College may be permitted to register for an Honors course with written permission from the Director of Honors, contingent upon the student’s GPA and space available in the course. Each Honors course carries Honors credit which will appear on the student’s transcript and will count toward completing the requirements of the Honors College. For additional information, contact Dr. Janetta Rebold Benton, Director, Pforzheimer Honors College, Mortola Library, third floor, Pleasantville campus, at 914 773-3848 or JBenton@pace.edu.

 

ART 201 ART HISTORY: ANCIENT GREEK ART, 3 credits, crn 23058

Prerequisite: None
Fulfills: Area of Knowledge 2 or Area of Knowledge 4
Day: M 9:05-12:10 pm, Constantin Marinescu

Course Description: This course offers a survey of architecture, sculpture, and painting from their origins in pre-historic art through the periods of Minoan, Mycenaean, and Greek geometric, archaic, classical, and Hellenistic antiquity.  A trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art is included.

NEW COURSE! ENV 296T ENVIRONMENTAL ROOTS AND RIGHTS: THE PRACTICE AND PRINCIPLES OF AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTALISM, 3 credits, crn 23393

Prerequisite: None
Fulfills: Inquiry and Exploration; Writing-Enhanced course
Day: T 12:20-3:25 pm, John Cronin (recipient of the 2011 National Jefferson Award for Public Service), Robert Kennedy, Jr.

Course description: Rooted in citizen activism that dates to the earliest days of the republic, fundamental to the development of 20th-century democracy and pervasive in 21st-century politics, business, and social mores, American environmentalism helps define America and its place in the world.  The first half of the semester offers a survey of the development of American environmentalism from the blossoming of citizen activism in the founding days of the republic, to the growth of the American conservation movement, to the birth of the contemporary environmental movement and the world's most aggressive body of environmental law. The second half of the semester is devoted to a case study of a current high-profile environmental issue, culminating with competing teams of students drafting briefs, preparing exhibits, and making oral arguments in a moot court public hearing at Pace Law School presided by Pace Law Professor Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.  The course includes noted guest lecturers.

CIS 102W WEB DESIGN FOR NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS,  3 credits, crn 23059

Prerequisites: None
Fulfills: Area of Knowledge 1
Day: M 1:25-3:25 pm and one hour online, Jonathan Hill

Course description:  In this discipline-based course, students develop, implement, and enhance actual Web sites that benefit local non-profit agencies. Students are introduced to the methods of designing Web sites in a non-profit paradigm and are involved in Web sites in the field, working in teams that include clientele of the agencies.

COM 200   PUBLIC SPEAKING, 3 credits,  crn 21236

Prerequisite: None
Fulfills: Foundation Requirement
Day: W 9:05-12:10 am, Ellen Mandel

Course description: This course is devoted to instruction in the mechanisms of writing and presenting one’s own material. Included are outlining, addressing various audiences, style, and appropriate techniques of delivery, as well as the use of technology to enhance one’s presentation. This pragmatic, skills-oriented course is designed to provide a context for practicing the construction and presentation of well-reasoned public messages.

NEW COURSE!  EDU 201K  EXPERTISE: WHAT IS IT? WHY DO WE WANT IT? HOW CAN WE GET IT? 3 credits, crn 23112
Prerequisites: None
Fulfills:  Inquiry and exploration
Evening: W 6:00-8:45 pm, Joan Walker

Description: This course examines expert performance across a range of activities including the sciences, engineering, education, business, the arts, and sports. Drawing from psychology and anthropology, this course explores what counts as expertise and whether or not experts always have an advantage. Case studies and field research are used to deepen students’ understanding of six essential principles of expertise.  The concepts of individual and group expertise are considered.

ENG 201 WRITING IN THE DISCIPLINES, 3 credits, crn 20819

Prerequisite: ENG 120 and sophomore standing (completion of 45 college credits) crn 20819
Fee: $20
Fulfills: Foundation requirement
Day:  T 9:05-10:00 am, R 9:05-11:05 am, Linda Anstendig

Course description:  This course focuses on writing effective essays and research papers in disciplinary modes and in students’ fields of interest. Included are interviews, analysis of journal articles, and appropriate documentation style formats. Students work collaboratively, approaching issues from the perspective of their chosen majors.

LIT 211C  EARLY WORLD LITERATURE, 3 credits, crn 21197

Prerequisite: None
Fulfills: Area of Knowledge 3 or Area of Knowledge 4, Writing-Enhanced course
Day: T 4:30-5:55 pm, R 4:30-5:55 pm, Nicholas Catalano.

Course description: This course offers a comprehensive and comparative study of readings in a variety of Eastern and Western cultures beginning with classical Greece and Rome.

NUR 221 CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN NURSING AND HEALTH CARE, 3 credits, crn 23060

Prerequisite: None
Fulfills: Inquiry and Exploration
Evening: M 6:00-8:45 pm, David Ekstrom

Course description: This course focuses on the major ethnic and cultural groups as well as on dominant American beliefs as they pertain to nursing and health care. Cultural systems are studied utilizing systems theory and developmental theory. Attention is paid to stereotyping, communication, and specific health care benefits of different groups typically seen in New York service settings. Includes 5 on-line classes.

NEW COURSE!  PSY 271  PSYCHOLOGY OF MORALITY, 3 credits, crn 23391

Prerequisite: None
Fulfills: Inquiry and Exploration
Day: T 10:10-12:10 pm, R 11:15-12:10pm, Paul Griffin

Course description: What really makes people good or bad? How do we develop a sense of right and wrong? These are but two of the many important questions being investigated in moral psychology, a field of research that tries to address moral philosophical questions and issues by examining the biological, social, and psychological nature of why and how we become moral beings.

RES 202 GREAT IDEAS IN EASTERN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT, 3 credits, crn 23011

Prerequisite: None
Fulfills: Area of Knowledge 3
Evening: R 6:00-8:45 pm, Lawrence Hundersmarck

Course description:  This course examines the great ideas in Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. An in-depth study is offered of the most influential ideas regarding the nature of divinity and the essence of humanity that emerge from the different source documents and traditions of the major religions of the East.

SCI 160H  METEOROLOGY, 3 credits, crn 23014

Prerequisite: None
Fulfills: Lab science requirement
Day: M 3:35-5:35 pm, W 3:35-5:25 pm, Timothy Malloy and Mark Kramer

Course description: This course provides an introduction to meteorology, climate change, and weather forecasting, including current topics in the news that involve weather and/or climate, as well as the effects of weather and/or climate on the environment. 

SOC 200  SOCIAL CLASS, 3 credits, crn 20996

Prerequisite: None
Fulfills: Area of Knowledge 5
Day:  W 1:25-4:30 pm, Marie Werner

Course description: This class explores inequalities of social class and social status in the context of both American society and in an increasingly global economy. Classical and contemporary theories about the causes and consequences of class divisions, as well as the impact of class position on the lives of various social groups are studied. Attention is given to the role of various institutions in the reproduction of class. Attempts to address class inequalities in society are examined.

HONORS INDEPENDENT RESEARCH COURSES, 3 credits

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing, 3.3 GPA minimum

With the written approval of the appropriate professor, the department chairperson, and the Director of the Honors College, a student may select a topic that is not included in the usual course offerings for guided research. The student meets regularly with the professor to review progress. To receive Honors College credit, the results of this independent research must be presented at the Honors Independent Research Conference held every year at the end of April or beginning of May. Similarly, the Business Honors 495 course for seniors may also count as an Honors College course if the student presents the research results at the Honors Independent Research Conference.

Students may have their papers published in Transactions, the scholarly journal of the Dyson Society of Fellows, and also made available through Pace University’s Digital Commons.

 

HONORS OPTIONS COURSES, 3 credits

Prerequisite: None

The Honors Option is designed for Honors-level work in a non-Honors course. To receive Honors College credit, an additional paper (10-20 pages), project, or presentation is required. Written approval of the appropriate professor and the Director of the Honors College are necessary. Depending upon the number of credits completed prior to entering the Honors College, Honors students are limited to either one or two Honors options; other Honors course requirements must be completed in Honors courses.